Monthly Archives: August 2017

31Aug 2017

Money For Nothing? More Bad News For Fans Of Rewards Credit Cards – Forbes


A host of rewards cards have been shut or amended as a result of the fee cap (Shutterstock)

Everyone likes to get something for nothing, whether it’s that "free" cup of coffee earned from frequent visits to your favorite store or cashback earned when shopping online via a site like Quidco or TopCashback.

As a result, rewards credit cards have long been popular among sensible savers. The gimmick is a simple one – every time you spend using the rewards card, you’ll accrue points, which can then be converted into all sorts of different rewards in the future.

So long as you clear your balance in full each month, you are getting something for nothing – a reward for spending money that you would have done otherwise. Of course, if you don’t clear your balance entirely each month then these cards aren’t so good, as the interest you’ll be charged will quickly eat into the value of the rewards you accrue.

Sadly for fans of these clever bits of plastic, another couple of rewards cards have now been withdrawn, and they are unlikely to be the last.

The latest cards to go

MBNA has confirmed that it is to close two of its American Express rewards credit cards. The MBNA Rewards Credit Card and the MBNA Credit Card with Cashback – which have been shut off to new customers since 2015 – will be closed for good from 22 September. All cardholders will be sent a replacement Visa card, though spending on these cards will not accrue rewards.

In total around 75,000 cardholders are affected – those with the rewards card will need to spend their points by November, while those with the cashback card will have all cashback paid into their account in October.

Why cards are closing

These MBNA cards are not the first rewards cards to be closed or amended. Earlier this summer Barclaycard announced it was stopping its American Express cashback card, replacing it with a Visa paying half the rate of cashback, while recent years have seen a host of cashback and rewards cards scrapped.

This is all down to a cap introduced by the EU on interchange fees back in 2015.

These are the fees that card providers charge retailers every time shoppers opt to pay with a card, and are now capped at 0.2% for debit card transactions and 0.3% for credit card transactions.

The cap was introduced to ensure that consumers don’t end up being overcharged at the till, but it has had the added effect of causing a host of card providers to significantly scale back their credit card offers, making it that little bit harder to get a decent return when using your card at the checkout.

The Amex exception

It’s important to note that not all card providers are hit by this fee cap – American Express is exempt, though this only counts for American Express cards actually issued by American Express. If your Amex comes from another card provider, it won’t be exempt, hence the changes to MBNA’s Amex cards.

As a result, its cards remain some of the most attractive around for people looking to get something back when spending on plastic.

“>

A host of rewards cards have been shut or amended as a result of the fee cap (Shutterstock)

Everyone likes to get something for nothing, whether it’s that “free” cup of coffee earned from frequent visits to your favorite store or cashback earned when shopping online via a site like Quidco or TopCashback.

As a result, rewards credit cards have long been popular among sensible savers. The gimmick is a simple one – every time you spend using the rewards card, you’ll accrue points, which can then be converted into all sorts of different rewards in the future.

So long as you clear your balance in full each month, you are getting something for nothing – a reward for spending money that you would have done otherwise. Of course, if you don’t clear your balance entirely each month then these cards aren’t so good, as the interest you’ll be charged will quickly eat into the value of the rewards you accrue.

Sadly for fans of these clever bits of plastic, another couple of rewards cards have now been withdrawn, and they are unlikely to be the last.

The latest cards to go

MBNA has confirmed that it is to close two of its American Express rewards credit cards. The MBNA Rewards Credit Card and the MBNA Credit Card with Cashback – which have been shut off to new customers since 2015 – will be closed for good from 22 September. All cardholders will be sent a replacement Visa card, though spending on these cards will not accrue rewards.

In total around 75,000 cardholders are affected – those with the rewards card will need to spend their points by November, while those with the cashback card will have all cashback paid into their account in October.

Why cards are closing

These MBNA cards are not the first rewards cards to be closed or amended. Earlier this summer Barclaycard announced it was stopping its American Express cashback card, replacing it with a Visa paying half the rate of cashback, while recent years have seen a host of cashback and rewards cards scrapped.

This is all down to a cap introduced by the EU on interchange fees back in 2015.

These are the fees that card providers charge retailers every time shoppers opt to pay with a card, and are now capped at 0.2% for debit card transactions and 0.3% for credit card transactions.

The cap was introduced to ensure that consumers don’t end up being overcharged at the till, but it has had the added effect of causing a host of card providers to significantly scale back their credit card offers, making it that little bit harder to get a decent return when using your card at the checkout.

The Amex exception

It’s important to note that not all card providers are hit by this fee cap – American Express is exempt, though this only counts for American Express cards actually issued by American Express. If your Amex comes from another card provider, it won’t be exempt, hence the changes to MBNA’s Amex cards.

As a result, its cards remain some of the most attractive around for people looking to get something back when spending on plastic.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading
31Aug 2017

Time Travel Isn't Possible…Or Is It? – NBCNews.com


Special relativity teaches us that the three dimensions of space and the solitary dimension of time are woven together like a fabric. It’s impossible to think of them as separate entities, only a singular unified entity — space-time. We can’t think of motion through space without being mindful of motion through time, and vice versa. Left-right, up-down, back-forth and past-future are all on equal footing.

And yet, time does seem a little different. We have complete freedom of movement within space, but we cannot avoid our future. Time seems to have an “arrow,” whereas the spatial dimensions are ambidextrous. Given the unity between time and space, it leads to the obvious question: Is time travel, of any sort, possible? Under any circumstances? At all? [How Time Travel Works in Science Fiction (Infographic)]

Into the future: Sure

Oddly enough, the answer is yes! We cannot avoid moving into our futures, but we can control the rate that we move through time. This is a consequence of another lesson from relativity: Not all clocks are the same.

The speed at which you move through space determines the speed at which you move through time. In the succinct phrase: Moving clocks run slow.

Image::Many science fiction stories explore humanity's desire to travel back in time. Is such a thing really possible in our universe?|||[object Object]
Many science fiction stories explore humanity’s desire to travel back in time. Is such a thing really possible in our universe?
Universal

IF you could build a big enough rocket (don’t ask me how, that’s an engineering problem) to provide a constant acceleration of 1g (9.8 meters per second per second; the same acceleration as provided by the Earth’s gravity at its surface), you could reach the center of the Milky Way galaxy — a healthy 20,000 light-years away — in just a couple decades of your personal time.

You could stop for a few hours, have a picnic near Sagittarius A* (the black hole at the center of the galaxy), and then hop back in to your rocket and come back to Earth.

By the time you return you’ll be eligible for retirement benefits, if the institution providing those benefits is even around, because while you only traveled for a few decades according to the clock on your ship, about 40,000 years would’ve passed on the Earth.

[embedded content]

Closing the loop

Time is relative, but it still flows in the same direction for everyone. To ask if we can go into reverse is the domain of general relativity (GR) — this is the mathematical language we use to not only understand gravity, but the full connection between space-time and motion.

In GR, we ask a slightly more technical question: Is there any arrangement of matter and energy (the stuff that warps space-time) to permit the existence of closed time-like curves, or CTCs? I know this is jargon but it’s a fun phrase to toss around at parties. “Curve” here means a path, “time-like” means you never go faster than the speed of light, and “closed” means it returns to its starting point — in other words, its own past.

So, Oracle of Einstein, are CTCs permitted? Yes! Well….

Image::Creators of science fiction love to play with time travel, but is such a thing possible in the real universe?|||[object Object]
Creators of science fiction love to play with time travel, but is such a thing possible in the real universe?
BBC

The possibilities are finite

There are about half a dozen known configurations of space-time that allow CTCs, or time travel into the past. For example, Kurt Gödel (of Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem fame) discovered that if the expansion of the universe was accelerating (which it is) and the universe is also rotating, CTCs would be allowed and we could travel into our past on a whim.

As far as I can tell, Gödel used this solution to point out to Albert Einstein that perhaps GR wasn’t all it was cracked up to be — I mean, come on, shouldn’t any self-respecting theory of the natural world avoid such an obviously absurd solution?

But Gödel’s point was moot — all observations indicate that the universe is not rotating, so that particular solution does not apply to our universe, and time travel into the past is verboten.

Ah! But what if we were to construct an infinitely long massive cylinder and set it spinning on its axis near the speed of light. It would drag on space-time around it, and certain paths around that spinning cylinder would end up in their own past. Good thing there are no infinitely long massive cylinders in the universe, or we might have to worry.

Wait, I’ve got one: If you make a wormhole (a shortcut between two distant locations in space-time) and send one end racing off near the speed of light and bring it back, the normal time-dilation effects would put one end in the “future” of the other, so you could waltz right through the wormhole throat and end up in your past. What’s that? Wormholes require “negative mass” to exist, and negative mass does not exist in the universe? Well, hmm.

Into the past: Nope

It’s the same story every time (pardon the too-hard-to-resist pun). For every scenario we concoct in general relativity to allow CTCs and time travel into our own past, nature finds a way to confound our plans and rule out the scenario.

What’s going on? General relativity allows — in principle — time travel into the past, but it appears to be ruled out in every case. It seems like something funny is afoot, that there ought to be some fundamental rule to disallow time travel. But there isn’t one. We can’t point to any particle interaction at the subatomic level that clearly prevents the formation of CTCs.

Related

Science

The 7 Biggest Unanswered Questions in Physics

The inevitable progression of time from the past to the future resembles another indomitable law of nature: entropy. That’s the iron law of thermodynamics that states that closed systems go from ordered to disordered. (This law explains why an egg will never just happen to unscramble itself if you leave it alone long enough). Is time linked to entropy? Maybe, but that’s the subject of another article….

This story was originally published on Space.com.

FOLLOW NBC MACH ON TWITTER, FACEBOOK, AND INSTAGRAM.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading
31Aug 2017

Why The Same Credit Card May Vary From State to State – Forbes



your home state may also determine the features and conditions of your credit cards, or even whether certain cards are available to you at all.

Shutterstock

A recent settlement between American Express and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has raised the profile of these differences. It arises from how Amex customers in certain U.S. territories were the victims of “discriminatory practices.” The CFPB says these included “charging higher interest rates, imposing stricter credit cutoffs, and providing less debt forgiveness” to consumers in Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and other U.S. territories.

A few examples of the disparities show how egregious they could be. For example, in settlements with cardholders who were in arrears, the average Puerto Rican cardholder had to pay back 73% of the amount owed, the CFPB reports. In contrast, U.S. cardholders paid an average of 55%, and some settled for as little as 42% by accepting settlement offers that were never mailed to cardholders in Puerto Rico.

Amex also set stricter credit score requirements for its Puerto Rico cards than its comparable U.S. cards, the Bureau reports. As a result, the company denied credit to certain Puerto Rico card applicants who would have been approved for comparable U.S. cards had they lived in the 50 U.S. states, according to the CFPB.

More than 200,000 cardholders were affected. Amex has paid more than $95 million in redress to those customers, and is required by the CFPB to pay a further $1 million. The company has also agreed to cease the practices. No financial penalties were assessed, the CFPB says, because Amex self-reported the problems, voluntarily began redress with the affected customers and cooperated with the agency investigation.

Nothing, however, prevents Amex and other card issuers from withholding certain cards from the market in certain states and territories. As careful readers of credit-card agreements will know, Puerto Rico and other U.S. Territories are most often affected, but certain cards may not be offered in some continental states, too.

The most striking example is the Barclaycard Arrival Plus, named one the best airline and travel credit cards by ValuePenguin and other outlets. Despite the card’s popularity, Barclaycard does not offer this card to Iowa residents. Why the exclusion? Some have guessed that this is due to Iowa’s Consumer Credit Code, which caps delinquent payment fees at $15 — far lower than the Arrival Plus’ $37. A Barclaycard spokesperson alluded to this, saying they did not offer the Arrival Plus in Iowa due to the state’s credit card laws. However, this is a dubious claim since Barclaycard’s other credit cards simply lower the delinquent fee for Iowa residents to the state regulated $15. When we observed other conflicts between Iowa’s code and Barclaycard’s terms, the bank’s contract typically made an exception for Iowa residents to remain compliant with state law. The Arrival Plus was the only exception to this and it remains the only Barclaycard unavailable to Iowans.

N/A

A Screenshot from the Barclaycard Arrival Plus application page, which shows Iowans need not apply.

Even when a card is universally offered, terms can vary by state. Certain credit cards from Citibank offer insurance in the event a checked or carry-on baggage is lost, stolen or damaged. The benefit covers you for up to $3,000 per traveler. That is, unless you happen to be a New York resident, in which case your coverage is limited to just $2,000.

Indeed, New Yorkers tend to face worse terms on insurance-related benefits from all issuers. On Citicards that offer damage and theft protection, cardholders enjoy primary insurance coverage — meaning it kicks in before they need to file a claim with their home or renters insurance. For New Yorkers, the coverage is secondary.

These types of small differences are present throughout the credit card industry. Many likely go unnoticed, since they mostly apply to ancillary benefits such as insurance. Diligent readers will find these state-by-state exclusions and caveats deep within the fine print of their credit card agreements. Unfortunately, there’s precious little consumers can do about these variations. That’s largely because most are rooted in legal or regulatory differences between jurisdictions, rather than in the kind of discriminatory marketing practices that were highlighted in the American Express settlement.

“>

It’s no secret that where you live can have a huge impact on how much you pay in rent or taxes. Less widely known is the fact that your home state may also determine the features and conditions of your credit cards, or even whether certain cards are available to you at all.

Shutterstock

A recent settlement between American Express and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has raised the profile of these differences. It arises from how Amex customers in certain U.S. territories were the victims of “discriminatory practices.” The CFPB says these included “charging higher interest rates, imposing stricter credit cutoffs, and providing less debt forgiveness” to consumers in Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and other U.S. territories.

A few examples of the disparities show how egregious they could be. For example, in settlements with cardholders who were in arrears, the average Puerto Rican cardholder had to pay back 73% of the amount owed, the CFPB reports. In contrast, U.S. cardholders paid an average of 55%, and some settled for as little as 42% by accepting settlement offers that were never mailed to cardholders in Puerto Rico.

Amex also set stricter credit score requirements for its Puerto Rico cards than its comparable U.S. cards, the Bureau reports. As a result, the company denied credit to certain Puerto Rico card applicants who would have been approved for comparable U.S. cards had they lived in the 50 U.S. states, according to the CFPB.

More than 200,000 cardholders were affected. Amex has paid more than $95 million in redress to those customers, and is required by the CFPB to pay a further $1 million. The company has also agreed to cease the practices. No financial penalties were assessed, the CFPB says, because Amex self-reported the problems, voluntarily began redress with the affected customers and cooperated with the agency investigation.

Nothing, however, prevents Amex and other card issuers from withholding certain cards from the market in certain states and territories. As careful readers of credit-card agreements will know, Puerto Rico and other U.S. Territories are most often affected, but certain cards may not be offered in some continental states, too.

The most striking example is the Barclaycard Arrival Plus, named one the best airline and travel credit cards by ValuePenguin and other outlets. Despite the card’s popularity, Barclaycard does not offer this card to Iowa residents. Why the exclusion? Some have guessed that this is due to Iowa’s Consumer Credit Code, which caps delinquent payment fees at $15 — far lower than the Arrival Plus’ $37. A Barclaycard spokesperson alluded to this, saying they did not offer the Arrival Plus in Iowa due to the state’s credit card laws. However, this is a dubious claim since Barclaycard’s other credit cards simply lower the delinquent fee for Iowa residents to the state regulated $15. When we observed other conflicts between Iowa’s code and Barclaycard’s terms, the bank’s contract typically made an exception for Iowa residents to remain compliant with state law. The Arrival Plus was the only exception to this and it remains the only Barclaycard unavailable to Iowans.

N/A

A Screenshot from the Barclaycard Arrival Plus application page, which shows Iowans need not apply.

Even when a card is universally offered, terms can vary by state. Certain credit cards from Citibank offer insurance in the event a checked or carry-on baggage is lost, stolen or damaged. The benefit covers you for up to $3,000 per traveler. That is, unless you happen to be a New York resident, in which case your coverage is limited to just $2,000.

Indeed, New Yorkers tend to face worse terms on insurance-related benefits from all issuers. On Citicards that offer damage and theft protection, cardholders enjoy primary insurance coverage — meaning it kicks in before they need to file a claim with their home or renters insurance. For New Yorkers, the coverage is secondary.

These types of small differences are present throughout the credit card industry. Many likely go unnoticed, since they mostly apply to ancillary benefits such as insurance. Diligent readers will find these state-by-state exclusions and caveats deep within the fine print of their credit card agreements. Unfortunately, there’s precious little consumers can do about these variations. That’s largely because most are rooted in legal or regulatory differences between jurisdictions, rather than in the kind of discriminatory marketing practices that were highlighted in the American Express settlement.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading
31Aug 2017

Here's How Airlines Are Rewarding Flyers Who Donate to the Hurricane Harvey Relief Effort – Bravo (blog)


The airline industry is contributing to the Hurricane Harvey relief efforts — both in terms of financial contributions, and by tempting customers with some of their favorite currency: frequent flyer miles.

American Airlines is offering 10 miles for each dollar donated ($25 minimum) to American Red Cross. 

For making donations to to American Red Cross, Americares, Airlink, or Operation U.S.A., United Airlines will award travelers with 250 miles for donations of $50 to $99; 500 miles for donations of $100 to $249; and 1,000 miles for donations of $250 and higher. United also pledged to match the first $200,000 in donations; at press time, more than $1.4 million had already been collected.

Appropriately, many carriers also offered to rebook affected flyers on new flights for no charge. Most of the deadlines for those arrangements have passed, though a few offers are still active. 

Time noted that United, Frontier, and Spirit will waive any fare differences for certain tickets from the past week (travel dates vary by carrier), so long as the new itinerary is booked by August 30.

The airlines could use some good PR this year in the face of copious customer-service debacles — and far more importantly, Texas residents desperately need all the relief they can get.

Jet Set is Bravo’s launch pad for the most extravagant, luxurious, and unforgettable travel experiences. Ready for takeoff? Then Like us on Facebook to stay connected to our daily updates.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading
30Aug 2017

Dez Bryant rewards fan after learning he inspired 400-pound weight loss – For The Win


Cowboys fan Matthew Sistrunk worked to change his life two years ago.

According to Sistrunk, he once weighed over 500 pounds and worked to lose the weight since 2015. He tweeted at Tony Romo and Dez Bryant asking for a signed jersey if he could lose the weight. We don’t know if Sistrunk ever got the jersey, but he got the chance to thank Bryant in person for inspiring his 400-pound weight loss.

At training camp this week, Sistrunk was seated in the first row with a sign that said, “Dez Bryant inspired me to lose 400 pounds.” Bryant saw the sign and went over to Sistrunk.

Sistrunk got a pair of Bryant’s receiving gloves for the day after the Cowboys star learned of Sistrunk’s incredible transformation.

Bryant was definitely impressed.

(Thanks to Bleacher Report for sharing) 

Start-up will let fans rent jerseys, which would make your favorite player getting traded sting less

1hr ago

Long snapper Jon Dorenbos has Saints teammates screaming after amazing card tricks

2hr ago

Sorry, everyone: CBS’s Kevin Harlan is done doing play-by-play of idiots running on the field

2hr ago

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading
30Aug 2017

TravelBank raises $25 million to reward employees who save on travel budgets – TechCrunch



If you travel a lot for work, you know there are two kinds of employees. There are those who spend less than the budget allows and those who push it to the very limit.

Most people don’t feel incentivized to save money for their employer, so that’s why a handful of startups are attempting to solve this problem by rewarding travelers for cost-savings. TravelBank is the latest to do a funding round, this time raising a $25 million Series B round led by DCM Ventures with participation from NEA and Accel. (Competitors TripActions and Rocketrip have recently raised money, as well.)

TravelBank analyzes flights and determines a reasonable cost upfront. Employees who go under budget split the savings with their employer. While they aren’t technically given cash for this, the money is now automatically put into accounts for Lyft, Uber, Airbnb or now Amazon — effectively a digital gift card.

Co-founder and CEO Duke Chung spoke about competing with Concur, which was acquired by SAP for more than $8 billion in 2014. He believes there is an opportunity to build better software for business travel. With a focus on small business, Chung says TravelBank has already signed up 800 companies in the first nine months.

He explained that not only do the companies save money by motivating employees to select cheaper flights, but TravelBank’s software is completely free. Instead of asking companies to pay for the technology, TravelBank makes its money through commissions from the airlines.

Rich Wong, general partner at Accel, said he was happy to invest in TravelBank because he not only believes in the idea, but has worked with Chung before. Accel invested in Parature, a startup Chung also founded, and that business was sold to Microsoft.

Wong pointed to the pressure that startups and other businesses have to focus on their bottom lines. These days “expenses actually matter,” adding that TravelBank’s concept “matches the sensibility of the time.”

David Chao, co-founder and general partner from DCM, said he invested because “the incentive alignment is powerful and makes the value proposition to any corporations a slam dunk.” He believes it has a “business model that aligns the economic interests of the company, employees and TravelBank via an app that functions as a traveling business person’s best friend.”

TravelBank previously raised a $10 million Series A round from NEA and Accel last year. Chung says the additional funding will be used to double its team from about 30 employees to 60 employees within the year.

Featured Image: ipopba/iStock/Getty Images

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading
30Aug 2017

Washington man convicted in MN credit card scheme involving 117 cards – KMSP-TV


– A Washington man was convicted in a sophisticated credit card scheme involving 117 credit cards that were found in a hotel room in Bloomington, Minnesota.

According to the Hennepin County attorney’s office, Daniel Negase Asefaw, 31, was convicted of one count of identity theft for aiding and abetting possession of other people’s credit account information with intent to engage in unlawful activity. He is the first of six co-defendants to be convicted in this case.

On March 23, 2016, police were called to a Fed Ex facility about a suspicious package mailed from Seattle to a hotel in Bloomington. According to the criminal complaint, investigators found multiple blank credit cards in the package, hidden inside a pair of tennis shoes.

A controlled delivery was conducted at the hotel, and around noon, “Ali Khalifa,” later identified as Hassan Ameen Khan, came to the front desk to claim it. He was then arrested along with five other men, including Asefaw.

Officers went to Khan’s hotel room where they found multiple credit cards, laptop computers and a credit card embossing machine. 

Police recovered a total of 117 cards in the hotel room, and there were more than 80 credit card account numbers belonging to other people.

According to the charges, credit card fraud suspects often use blank credit cards they get in the mail to emboss and embed unknowing victims’ legitimate credit card information and then use the cloned cards to make multiple large purchases.

Asefaw was taken into custody and will be sentenced on Oct. 4. He is expected to receive 98 months in prison. Trials for the other five co-defendants begin Sept. 25.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading
30Aug 2017

Qantas is letting you use frequent flyer points to buy cinema tickets … – Business Insider



The Qantas Frequent Flyer program and Hoyts cinema chain have
struck a deal that lets you earn points while watching movies or
cash in your points at the cinema.

QFF members can trade 4,000 points to get $20 worth of discount
on tickets and cinema snacks, while members of the Hoyts Rewards
program can earn points on what they spend.

Qantas Loyalty CEO Lesley Grant said the program’s 11.8 million
members can simply scan their frequent flyer card at the cinema
to redeem points.

“We’re all used to scanning our debit or credit cards to make
payments at the checkout so it makes sense that Qantas Frequent
Flyers want to use their membership cards in the same way,” she
said.

But if you’d rather keep building up your points, Hoyts Rewards
bronze members will earn one Qantas point per $2 spent and silver
members two Qantas points per $1 spent

Hoyts has around 430 screens across Australia and New Zealand and
will be the airline’s exclusive movie partner.

Read more posts on Business Insider Australia
»

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading
30Aug 2017

10 High-Risk Stocks to Buy for Massive Rewards – Investorplace.com



Slow and steady wins the race, as the old adage goes. But slow and steady can be a bit boring. Investors looking for stocks to buy, as a rule, should focus on high-quality, and preferably lower-risk, issues.

Still, there’s room in any investor’s portfolio for higher-risk, higher-reward plays — as long as those risks are understood.

In that vein, here are 10 stocks to buy that offer potentially significant rewards, and almost as much risk. None of these stocks should be a core part of a portfolio, and all have the potential to blow up in your face.

But taking those risks also creates the possibility of a major reward. It’s likely at least a few of these stocks will wind up big winners going forward.

Next Page

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading
30Aug 2017

Time Travel Isn't Possible…Or Is It? – Space.com


[unable to retrieve full-text content]


Space.com

Time Travel Isn't Possible…Or Is It?
Space.com
There are about half a dozen known configurations of space-time that allow CTCs, or time travel into the past. For example, Kurt Gödel (of Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem fame) discovered that if the expansion of the universe was accelerating (which it



Source link

Continue Reading